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Ode to the Keepers of the Western Door

30.00"W x 20.00"H x 0.5"D

$3,110 (Shipping Included)

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Matt O'Neill

Elmira Heights, NY

Medium: Painting

Subject Tags: hatenotha, spirit, hunter, singer, warrior, homage, abstract expressionism, native american, feather, iriquois, seneca

Media: watercolor on paper

Size: 30"W x 20"H x 0.5"D

Year Created: 2018

Ready to Hang

The Seneca are also known as the "Keeper of the Western Door," for the Seneca are the westernmost of the Six Nations. At the time of the formation of the Iroquois League, the original five nations of the Iroquois League occupied large areas of land in the Northeast USA and Southeast Canada.

In the Seneca language we are known as O-non-dowa-gah, (pronounced: Oh-n'own-dough-wahgah) or "Great Hill People."

The historical Seneca occupied territory throughout the Finger Lakes area in Central New York, and in the Genesee Valley in Western New York, living in longhouses on the riversides. The villages were well fortified with wooden stake fences, just one of the many industrious undertakings.

The people relied heavily on agriculture for food, growing the Three Sisters: corn, beans, and squash, which were known as Deohako,(pronounced: Jo- hay- ko) "the life supporters." In addition to raising crops, the early Seneca were also subsistence hunters and fishers.

The Senecas were also highly skilled at warfare, and were considered fierce adversaries. But the Seneca were also renowned for their sophisticated skills at diplomacy and oratory and their willingness to unite with the other original five nations to form the Iroquois Confederacy of Nations.

Learn more at www.sni.org

The grind and excitement of near-constant movement has given me a stormy and tense relationship to space, and to movement within that space. From walled-off Berlin, foggy Vienna, quaint Alpine villages, and myriad boxy American cities--each environment adding something subtle to my creations. I often pose the philosophical question--why would a thing need to represent another thing, if its own beauty in form should be recognized? I crave tension--seeking truth through examination of angles, trial--error, and the narrative that develops visually through the "indelibility" of contact between pen and paper.

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